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Low-carb diets could shorten life, study suggests – BBC News

Low-carb diets could shorten life

Low-carb diets could shorten lifeThe diet advice yo-yo continues… now low-carb diets could shorten life. The “evil” carb may not be so evil after all, especially when compared to a diet high in animal products.

Low-carb diets, such as Atkins, have become increasingly popular for weight loss and have shown promise for lowering the risk of some illnesses.

But a US study over 25 years indicates that moderate carb consumption – or switching meat for plant-based protein and fats – is healthier.

The study relied on people remembering the amount of carbohydrates they ate.

In the study, published in The Lancet Public Health, 15,400 people from the US filled out questionnaires on the food and drink they consumed, along with portion sizes.

From this, scientists estimated the proportion of calories they got from carbohydrates, fats, and protein.

After following the group for an average of 25 years, researchers found that those who got 50-55% of their energy from carbohydrates (the moderate carb group and in line with UK dietary guidelines) had a slightly lower risk of death compared with the low and high-carb groups.

The scientists then compared low-carb diets rich in animal proteins and fats with those that contained lots of plant-based protein and fat.

They found that eating more beef, lamb, pork, chicken and cheese in place of carbs was linked with a slightly increased risk of death.

But replacing carbohydrates with more plant-based proteins and fats, such as legumes and nuts, was actually found to slightly reduce the risk of mortality.

Graph showing risk of death and carbohydrate diets

For more information please see original article: Low-carb diets could shorten life, study suggests – BBC News

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How the humble cabbage can stop cancers – BBC News

The Humble Cabbage Fights Cancer

Humble Cabbage Fights CancerCould an agent in the fight against cancer be lying at our feet? The humble cabbage has been a food staple in many ethnic dishes for centuries: sauerkraut, kimchi, borscht, among others. In addition to filling millions of bellies, the humble cabbage fights cancer according to new research.

That cruciferous veg is good for the gut has never been in doubt but a detailed explanation has been elusive.

The team at the Francis Crick Institute found anti-cancer chemicals were produced as the vegetables were digested.

Cancer Research UK said there were plenty of reasons to eat more veg.

The work focused on how vegetables alter the lining of the intestines, by studying mice and miniature bowels growing in the lab.

Like the skin, the surface of the bowels is constantly being regenerated in a process that takes four to five days.

But this constant renewal needs to be tightly controlled, otherwise it could lead to cancer or gut inflammation.

And the work, published in the journal Immunity, showed chemicals in cruciferous vegetables were vital.

Dr Stockinger said the findings were a “cause for optimism”.

She has reduced the amount of meat she eats and now consumes a lot more vegetables.

She told the BBC: “A lot of dietary advice we’re getting changes periodically – it is very confusing and not clear cut what the causes and consequences are.

“Just telling me it’s good for me without a reason will not make me eat it.

“With this study, we have the molecular mechanisms about how this system works.”

For more information please see original article: How the humble cabbage can stop cancers – BBC News

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The HealthCare Too model provides for a collaborative holistic care approach to health. We look for articles and knowledge to help consumers and their care teams make holistic health decisions and also shop for the best deals in holistic health so you can find them here! We appreciate the value of surgery and pharmaceuticals but want to make more paths available for your HealthCare Too. See our model for Holistic Health for more information!

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Mental Healthy Eating | How What You Eat Affects Your Mental Health     

Mental Healthy Eating

Mental Healthy EatingLike physical health, our mental health is also influenced by our diet among other things. Unfortunately, research is lagging on the critical connection for mental healthy eating but this article does shed some light.

They say you are what you eat, and we all know that the foods we eat have an effect on our weight and our physical health. What most people don’t overlook is the effect that your diet has on mental health.

Making healthy choices when it comes to food can be difficult, especially when you can get a fast food hamburger for $1 and a salad costs you $4-5, but it’s more important than a lot of people realize. Up to 50% of the determinants of our physical health come through lifestyle and personal behaviors. This includes food, physical activity, and bad habits like smoking and alcohol use.

Even the Department of Health and Human Services started to look into the effects that diet can have on mental health. Many of the chemicals found in food that could be beneficial, such as omega3 fatty acids as a potential treatment aid for depression, haven’t been studied enough to be considered treatment options. Still, they have finally started to take some steps in the right direction.

For more information please see the original article: How What You Eat Affects Your Mental Health

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The HealthCare Too model provides for a collaborative holistic care approach to health. We look for articles and knowledge to help consumers and their care teams make holistic health decisions and also shop for the best deals in holistic health so you can find them here! We appreciate the value of surgery and pharmaceuticals but want to make more paths available for your HealthCare Too. See our model for Holistic Health for more information!

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Aetna President: Why Health Care Is Moving Beyond the Physical Body

Healthcare Beyond The Physical Body

Healthcare Beyond The Physical BodyThere are many things that are healthcare too… and hence the name of our company, HealthCare Too, back in 2013. It is nice to see others getting on board. Karen S. Lynch, president of Aetna, wrote about the overwhelming impact of “social determinants” on our health and recognized that healthcare goes beyond the physical body. It is time other companies embrace all that is healthcare too!

We have been evaluating wellness through the lens of social determinants of health at Aetna for quite some time, and believe we are on the right path when it comes to improving health. One way we are doing this is through a partnership with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health on a multi-year research project aimed at the tangible impact of social determinants of health on members’ overall well-being.

But to sustainably manage the health needs of individuals, we must transform health care overall by shifting from a reactive, “sick care” approach to a proactive, “well care” approach—focused on maintaining good physical and mental health for all individuals.

It’s clear that consumers are making holistic health a priority, and it’s time that the health care industry does too. By considering all factors of a person’s life, we, as an industry, will be able to provide consumers with the resources and support they need to live longer, happier, and healthier lives.

Source: Aetna President: Why Health Care Is Moving Beyond the Physical Body | Fortune

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The HealthCare Too model provides for a collaborative holistic care approach to health. We look for articles and knowledge to help consumers and their care teams make holistic health decisions and also shop for the best deals in holistic health so you can find them here! We appreciate the value of surgery and pharmaceuticals but want to make more paths available for your HealthCare Too. See our model for Holistic Health for more information!

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How Smoking In 1958 Is Like Eating In 2018

Cigarette Diet?

Cigarette DietHave we replaced one poor-health habit with another? It took decades and major court decisions to tarnish cigarettes. It wasn’t long ago that people smoked in their offices. Now we munch on bags of potato chips, cheese poofs, and other crunchy killers.

“Most deaths in the United States are preventable and related to nutrition.” According to the most rigorous analysis of risk factors ever published, the Global Burden of Disease study, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, our diet is both the number-one cause of death and the number-one cause of disability in the United States, having bumped smoking tobacco down to number two. Smoking now kills about a half million Americans every year, whereas our diet kills hundreds of thousands more.

If most death and disability is preventable and related to nutrition, then, certainly, nutrition is the number-one subject taught in medical school and the number-one topic your doctor talks with you about, right? How can there be such a disconnect between the science and the practice of medicine?

Eating the Standard American Diet today is like being a smoker in the 1950s. Just as smoking was rampant back then, think about what we’re feeding even hospital patients to this day.

We don’t have to wait until society catches up with the science. Sometimes it takes a whole generation for things to change in medicine. The old guard of smoking physicians and medical school professors die off, and a new generation takes its place—but how many patients need to die in the interim?

For more information please see the original article: How Smoking In 1958 Is Like Eating In 2018 | Care2 Healthy Living

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Diet-driven hair loss and skin damage may be reversible

Diet Can Impact Skin

Diet Can Impact SkinThere is nothing wrong with being bald… says bald father, Tim. That said, there are many people who invest in preventing baldness or restoring hair as well as numerous skin conditions. There may be another, more holistic way, to address baldness and skin concerns. New research highlights that diet can impact skin as well as baldness in some individuals.

In a study conducted in mice, researchers from Johns Hopkins were able to confirm that a Western-style diet — high in fats and cholesterol — has a negative impact on hair and skin health. They went even further, however, developing a drug that is able to reverse the damage.

Can an experimental compound treat hair loss and skin damage caused by diet?In an open access paper recently published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports, Subroto Chatterjee and colleagues from Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, MD, show that a diet high in fats and cholesterol can lead to skin inflammation, as well as hair loss and hair whitening.

Based on their initial findings, the researchers also developed an experimental drug, D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (D-PDMP), hoping it would help them reverse the effects of an unhealthful diet on skin and hair.

D-PDMP regulates the production of a type of fats (lipids) known as “glycosphingolipids” (GSLs), which are part of the membranes of skin cells and other cell types.

In particular, GSLs are a major component of skin cells that make up the external skin layer and of keratinocytes, a type of cell that participates in the pigmentation, or coloring, of skin, hair, and eyes.

“Further research is needed, but our findings show promise for someday using the drug we developed for skin diseases such as psoriasis and wounds resulting from diabetes or plastic surgery,” says Chatterjee.

For more information please see the original article: Diet-driven hair loss and skin damage may be reversible

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The HealthCare Too model provides for a collaborative holistic care approach to health. We look for articles and knowledge to help consumers and their care teams make holistic health decisions and also shop for the best deals in holistic health so you can find them here! We appreciate the value of surgery and pharmaceuticals but want to make more paths available for your HealthCare Too. See our model for Holistic Health for more information!

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Why the ‘eat a healthy, balanced diet’ advice is meaningless

Treatment Includes Healthy Diet

Treatment Includes Healthy DietThere is simply no doubt that diet impacts health, sometimes remarkably. Why is it that “eat a healthy, balanced diet” is too often the best we can get during a physician visit? These are smart people who can drill down to specifics of anatomy or many pharmaceuticals. Yet so few physicians have been trained or have the time or can get appropriately reimbursed for personalized nutrition. 80% or more of our health is determined outside the clinic and diet comprises a significant part of that 80%. That we need to eat a “healthy, balanced diet” with “portion control” is advice we can get from any kid’s TV show. It is time that clinical treatment includes healthy diet advice that goes beyond the obvious, especially for those facing cancer.

Most oncologists have very little interest – let alone training – in nutrition, but have an incredibly engaged audience sitting opposite them, dead keen to hear what they think we should do and eat during treatment.

The general advice of “eat a healthy, balanced diet” is absolutely meaningless for most people, especially if you acknowledge that there is no one-size fits-all approach for diets. If we are getting to the stage of precision and targeted medicine when it comes to carcinogenic agents, then surely we can do better when it comes to personalised nutrition that could help us during treatment? Telling someone to eat plenty of fruit and wholegrains can be interpreted in many ways. For some people, they will think that eating lots of bananas, pineapples, mangoes, grapes, potatoes and wholegrain cereals, pasta and bread is ticking that box of “wholegrains and plenty of fruit and veg”.

Unfortunately, the idea that truly beneficial wholegrain can actually be found in a box of cereal or sliced bread is incorrect. And by lumping fruit and vegetables together, you are dodging the important point that the better source of nutrients and phyto-chemicals comes from vegetables (not including potatoes), herbs, spices, dark and bitter greens and lower sugar fruits, like berries and green apples.

It’s also important to remember how we eat. In Nutritionism, Gyorgy Scrinis (professor of food and nutrition politics and policy at the University of Melbourne) suggests that a common feature of Japanese and Mediterranean diets (often hailed as the healthiest diets to follow) is the lack of processed food and abundance of fresh, natural whole foods, based on local and available produce – focusing on quality, not quantity.

For more information please see the original article: Why the ‘eat a healthy, balanced diet’ advice is meaningless

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The HealthCare Too model provides for a collaborative holistic care approach to health. We look for articles and knowledge to help consumers and their care teams make holistic health decisions and also shop for the best deals in holistic health so you can find them here! We appreciate the value of surgery and pharmaceuticals but want to make more paths available for your HealthCare Too. See our model for Holistic Health for more information!

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Menopause can be unsettling. These habits can help smooth the transition

Preparing For Menopause

Preparing For MenopauseAs a Society it is perhaps time that the US stop leaving the conversation of menopause to comedians. It is a natural (and healthy) progression for women, not just “hot flashes” and “mood swings”. Ancient medical systems like Traditional Chinese Medicine have treated menopause not as an illness or a condition to be endured but as a change that requires balance throughout the whole person. Preparing for menopause with better lifestyle choices can make the actual transformation less disruptive.

For something that’s been discussed as far back as Aristotle, there is still a lot that’s unknown about menopause. But new research is shedding light on how women can better manage this often-unsettling time in their lives.

While the average age for natural menopause (365 days without a period) in the United States is 51, perimenopausal, or early, symptoms can occur in some women years before, and the intensity of symptoms varies greatly. Some women may experience weight gain, specifically in the abdominal region, decreased muscle mass and increased fat mass, as well as hot flashes and mood changes. In addition, women have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

The factors that can lead to these outcomes are as variable as women’s experiences of menopause. They can include genetics, lifestyle choices, metabolic changes, hormonal shifts and environmental factors.

Given that they don’t know when they’ll go through it or how it will affect them, many women in their 40s and younger don’t give much thought to menopause. But considering how issues with weight, mood, health and emotions can snowball, perhaps we should focus on establishing habits that could make for a smoother transition through this life stage. This is where nutrition, exercise and avoiding weight gain can play a role. It’s even possible that nutritional choices can delay the natural onset of menopause, according to an intriguing new study from the United Kingdom.

In this first-of-its-kind study, a team from the University of Leeds followed 914 women for four years, examining their food and nutrient intake related to age of natural menopause.

For more information please see the original article: Menopause can be unsettling. These habits can help smooth the transition. – The Washington Post

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The HealthCare Too model provides for a collaborative holistic care approach to health. We look for articles and knowledge to help consumers and their care teams make holistic health decisions and also shop for the best deals in holistic health so you can find them here! We appreciate the value of surgery and pharmaceuticals but want to make more paths available for your HealthCare Too. See our model for Holistic Health for more information!

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Why Eating Plant-Based Can Boost Your Mental Health – One Green Planet

Plant-Based Diet Boosts Mental Health

Plant-Based Diet Boosts Mental HealthIt has become commonly accepted in recent years that a plant-based diet promotes health. Plant-based practitioners do not necessarily exclude meat and dairy but certainly reduces (or eliminates) them. Newer to the scene, however, is that a plant-based diet boosts mental health. In a modern world riddled with stress and a sagging state of mental health, this is wonderful news.

What you eat influences every area of your body, including your brain. It is important to consider what you put into your body, because that food will become the fuel for your mind. When you feed yourself nutritious, plant-based foods filled with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, you are protecting your brain from oxidative stress and free radicals. If you deny your body and mind healthy foods, free radicals could wreak havoc and negatively impair cognition and mentality.

Another link to nutrition and mental well-being begins within the gastrointestinal tract. Because 95% of serotonin is produced in the gastrointestinal tract, it seems that the digestive system not only breaks down food but also may trigger your emotions. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that plays many different roles, including stabilizing your mood, aiding with sleep, helping your body digest food, and impacting your motor skills. If you have low levels of serotonin in the body, you are more likely to experience depression, anxiety, or have trouble sleeping.

Certain foods trigger the synthesis of serotonin because they contain an amino acid found in proteins called tryptophan. In order to maintain normal serotonin levels, it is important to consume foods containing tryptophan. While some animal products contain this amino acid, recent studies have shown that it may not be the best source.

Dr. Michael Greger explains that amino acids compete with one another for access to the blood-brain barrier. Because tryptophan is found in low doses in animal products compared to other amino acids, it gets pushed out of the way causing tryptophan levels in the brain to decline. However, when you consume plant-based foods, insulin is released due to the carbohydrate intake. This causes other amino acids to be taken in as fuel so that tryptophan can be the first one to access the brain.

This is why it consuming vegan sources of tryptophan with high levels of other beneficial nutrients is optimal so that this amino acid can successfully access the brain and synthesize serotonin.

For more information please see the original article: Why Eating Plant-Based Can Boost Your Mental Health – One Green Planet

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Is Hummus Healthy? | Time

Healthy Hummus

Healthy HummusOnce relegated to Middle Eastern restaurants, Hummus has made its way into many mainstream restaurants as well as significant shelf space in American grocery stores. Why? Sure it tastes good but is there more? Perhaps we see hummus as a health addition to our lifestyle?

Hummus, the chickpea-based dip that’s a staple in many Middle Eastern cuisines, is on the rise in the U.S. Multiple factors are fueling its growing popularity, according to the USDA: Hummus is naturally gluten-free, and Americans now have bigger appetites for healthier snacks. But how healthy is hummus? Here’s what the experts say.

What is hummus made of?

Traditional hummus is made from a blend of chickpeas, olive oil, tahini (sesame paste), lemon juice and spices, and this mix makes for a nutrient-dense food, says Elizabeth G. Matteo, a registered dietitian at Boston University’s Sargent Choice Nutrition Center. “It generally offers more vitamins and minerals than many other dips or spreads,” she says, since it includes calcium, folate and magnesium.

This blend of nutrients can also stabilize blood sugar and help prevent heart disease, says Los Angeles-based registered dietitian Lindsey Pine. Hummus also contains what she calls the “trifecta of macronutrients”—healthy fat, protein and fiber—that keep you full and satisfied, which is key to maintaining a healthy weight.Just like beans, lentils, peas and other dry, edible legume seeds that fall into the ‘pulses’ category, chickpeas are a good source of protein and fiber compared to other plants. But don’t expect to get your daily dose of either from hummus alone: a two-tablespoon serving of the dip contains two grams of protein and one gram of fiber. (The daily government recommendation is about 50 grams of protein per day for an average adult; for dietary fiber, the recommendations are about 25 grams a day for women and around 38 grams a day for men.) Chickpeas also are not a complete source of protein, meaning they don’t have all of the essential amino acids that meat, fish, dairy and eggs do.

For more information please see the original article: Is Hummus Healthy? | Time

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The HealthCare Too model provides for a collaborative holistic care approach to health. We look for articles and knowledge to help consumers and their care teams make holistic health decisions and also shop for the best deals in holistic health so you can find them here! We appreciate the value of surgery and pharmaceuticals but want to make more paths available for your HealthCare Too. See our model for Holistic Health for more information!

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